Flies

Flies

Flies can become nuisance pests, but also are important for their potential to harm humans and animals. House flies, for example, can spread diseases such as food poisoning and dysentery.
The habits of flies encourage the spread of bacteria and other disease-causing organisms. Flies often feed and lay eggs on rubbish, manure and dead animals before contaminating human foods and food preparation surfaces by landing on them. When feeding, house flies regurgitate their stomach contents onto food to liquefy it before ingesting it. They also may contaminate food and surfaces by defecating on them.

Signs of infestation:

Cluster of flies, either alive or dead.
Fly spotting or droppings, produced when flies feed and then defecate on food.
Maggots, which are flies in their larval stage.

Fly facts:

The average house fly lives on average 21 days.
A fly’s wing beats 200 times per second.
Flies don’t grow. They are born full size.
Flies have 4000 lenses in each eye.
Flies jump up and backwards when taking off.

Diseases carried by Flies:

Campylobacter
Streptococci
Salmonella
Klebsiella
Chlamydia
Dysentery
Gastroenteritis
Lower Respiratory Infections
Urinary Tract Infections

House Fly

Pest Control Housefly

Pest Control Housefly

Recognition:

The adults are 8–12 mm long. Their thorax is gray, with four longitudinal dark lines on the back and their whole body is covered with hair-like projections. The females are slightly larger than the males, and have a much larger space between their red compound eyes.

 

Blowflies (Bluebottle, Greenbottle)

Recognition:

Adults are commonly shiny with metallic colouring, often with blue, green, or black thoraxes and abdomen. Antennae are 3-segmented.

Fruit Flies

Recognition:

Adults are about 3 mm long and usually have red eyes. The front portion of the body is beige and the rear portion is black.

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